Across the board, intuitive, and graphical tool that takes the company’s perspective on risk assessment. Rewards water’s role in business strategy, operations, and beyond supply chain engagement.

Description

The Aqua Gauge is an Excel-based tool that produces an intuitive, graphic output of a company’s water performance. Companies and investors can use the tool to evaluate a company’s existing water risk management approach, evaluating 20 core aspects of water risk management on a sliding scale from initial steps to leading practice.

The Aqua Gauge assessment covers all aspects of water risk management — from policy development and data gathering, to business planning and goal-setting, stakeholder engagement and disclosure. It considers water in strategy and operations, and includes policy to guide the procurement function. The Aqua Gauge was developed by Ceres, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), Irbaris and the Investor Responsibility Research Center (IRRC) Institute. It reflects the input and feedback of representatives from over 50 financial institutions, companies (including Coca-Cola, Nestlé) NGOs (AWS, WRI, WWF, CEO Water Mandate among others), and is supported by investors managing over $2 trillion in assets.

Farming

Data on the company’s water use and environmental impacts on direct water sources should be collected and monitored. Environmental impacts include over-abstraction, redirection of natural watercourses, disruption to the timing and intensity of environmental flows. Additionally, data on external factors affecting direct water sources should be collected and monitored. These include climate change, economic and social development, public policy, supply/treatment costs and impacts of other users.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This includes analysis of current and future watershed conditions and the type of water sources used by the facilities. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

The company should measure the effectiveness of suppliers’ water management practices, and have policies and programs in place to encourage and incentivize (educational support, direct and indirect financial incentives) suppliers who take measures to reduce water use and protect water resources in the basin they operate in.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This includes the type of water sources used by the facilities and the impacts they have (for direct operations).

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. Depending on the selected tool, this may include analysis of irrigated water. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. Depending on the selected tool, this may include analysis of fertilizer and pesticide use. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. The majority of these, in turn, consider fertilizer and pesticide use. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, WBCSD’s Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, WRI’s Aqueduct and WWF’s Water Risk Filter.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This includes analysis of the impacts on biodiversity. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, WBCSD’s Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, WRI’s Aqueduct, WWF/DEG Water Filter.

Direct operations should measure and report water consumption in total, water recycling and reuse and set targets on reducing water use. Suppliers who measure, manage and report water use should be premiered. This can be done by drawing up supplier policies, collecting data, implementing water saving programs, setting time-bound goals for agricultural sourcing, promoting multi-stakeholder efforts and using certified sources.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This includes analysis of water reuse and recycling. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This may include analysis of the handling of water used for cleaning. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This may include analysis of energy consumption and waste. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Data on the company’s water use and social impacts on direct water sources should be collected and monitored. Social impacts include changes in access to clean water with related impacts on human health and well-being, costs to the local community, cultural or religious issues, restrictions on access to water, costs and charges, impacts or limitations on other economic activities.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. Depending on the selected tool, this may include analysis of local circumstances and company impacts in the context of WASH. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

The company should collect and monitor data on external factors affecting direct water sources, including climate change.

Additionally, water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This may include analysis of climate change impact and adaptation measures. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Direct operations should report wastewater discharge total volumes and volume by destination, treatment method and effluent parameters for all significant facilities. Data should be externally verified. Standards and goals should be set on wastewater discharge and impacts.

Suppliers who measure and reduce wastewater and pollution impacts should be premiered. This can be done by drawing up supplier policies, collecting data, implementing water quality measures, setting time-bound goals for agricultural sourcing, promoting multi-stakeholder efforts and using certified sources.

Additionally, water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. Depending on the selected tool, this may include analysis of water runoff and wastewater management. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This may include analysis of soil management and erosion practices. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This may include analysis of soil management and compaction prevention practices. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This may include analysis of soil management and soil fertility boosting measures. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Processing

Data on the company’s water use and environmental impacts on direct water sources should be collected and monitored. Environmental impacts include over-abstraction, redirection of natural watercourses, disruption to the timing and intensity of environmental flows. Additionally, data on external factors affecting direct water sources should be collected and monitored. These include climate change, economic and social development, public policy, supply/treatment costs and impacts of other users.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This includes analysis of current and future watershed conditions and the type of water sources used by the facilities. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

The company should measure the effectiveness of suppliers’ water management practices, and have policies and programs in place to encourage and incentivize (educational support, direct and indirect financial incentives) suppliers who take measures to reduce water use and protect water resources in the basin they operate in.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This includes the type of water sources used by the facilities and the impacts they have (for direct operations).

Direct operations should report wastewater discharge total volumes and volume by destination, treatment method and effluent parameters for all significant facilities. Data should be externally verified. Standards and goals should be set on wastewater discharge and impacts.

Suppliers who measure and reduce wastewater and pollution impacts should be premiered. This can be done by drawing up supplier policies, collecting data, implementing water quality measures, setting time-bound goals for agricultural sourcing, promoting multi-stakeholder efforts and using certified sources.

Additionally, water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. Depending on the selected tool, this may include analysis of water runoff and wastewater management. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. Depending on the selected tool, this may include analysis of water used for cooling and heating. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and Water Risk Filter.

Direct operations should measure and report water consumption in total, water recycling and reuse and set targets on reducing water use. Suppliers who measure, manage and report water use should be premiered. This can be done by drawing up supplier policies, collecting data, implementing water saving programs, setting time-bound goals for agricultural sourcing, promoting multi-stakeholder efforts and using certified sources.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. This includes analysis of water reuse and recycling. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

Data on the company’s water use and social impacts on direct water sources should be collected and monitored. Social impacts include changes in access to clean water with related impacts on human health and well-being, costs to the local community, cultural or religious issues, restrictions on access to water, costs and charges, impacts or limitations on other economic activities.

Water risk assessments should be conducted for direct operations, manufacturing supply chain and agricultural supply chain. Depending on the selected tool, this may include analysis of local circumstances and company impacts in the context of WASH. Potential tools include, but are not limited to, the Global Water Tool, GEMI’s Local Water Tool, the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (iBAT), the Water Footprint Assessment tool, Aqueduct and the Water Risk Filter.

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